mxtori:

businessinsider:

7 QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK AT THE END OF EVERY JOB INTERVIEW.
Click here to find out why these questions help you.

This is so important!I never know what to ask and end up looking like a fool cause I don’t have a question prepared. Don’t be me.
mxtori:

businessinsider:

7 QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK AT THE END OF EVERY JOB INTERVIEW.
Click here to find out why these questions help you.

This is so important!I never know what to ask and end up looking like a fool cause I don’t have a question prepared. Don’t be me.
mxtori:

businessinsider:

7 QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK AT THE END OF EVERY JOB INTERVIEW.
Click here to find out why these questions help you.

This is so important!I never know what to ask and end up looking like a fool cause I don’t have a question prepared. Don’t be me.
mxtori:

businessinsider:

7 QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK AT THE END OF EVERY JOB INTERVIEW.
Click here to find out why these questions help you.

This is so important!I never know what to ask and end up looking like a fool cause I don’t have a question prepared. Don’t be me.
mxtori:

businessinsider:

7 QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK AT THE END OF EVERY JOB INTERVIEW.
Click here to find out why these questions help you.

This is so important!I never know what to ask and end up looking like a fool cause I don’t have a question prepared. Don’t be me.
mxtori:

businessinsider:

7 QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK AT THE END OF EVERY JOB INTERVIEW.
Click here to find out why these questions help you.

This is so important!I never know what to ask and end up looking like a fool cause I don’t have a question prepared. Don’t be me.
mxtori:

businessinsider:

7 QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK AT THE END OF EVERY JOB INTERVIEW.
Click here to find out why these questions help you.

This is so important!I never know what to ask and end up looking like a fool cause I don’t have a question prepared. Don’t be me.
mxtori:

businessinsider:

7 QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK AT THE END OF EVERY JOB INTERVIEW.
Click here to find out why these questions help you.

This is so important!I never know what to ask and end up looking like a fool cause I don’t have a question prepared. Don’t be me.

mxtori:

businessinsider:

7 QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK AT THE END OF EVERY JOB INTERVIEW.

Click here to find out why these questions help you.

This is so important!

I never know what to ask and end up looking like a fool cause I don’t have a question prepared.

Don’t be me.

whedonesque:

Nathan Fillion’s panel Q&A at Phoenix Comic Con | June 7, 2014 (x)

Q: If Firefly had gone on longer, what is something you would’ve hoped to have gotten to do with either just Mal or the story in general?

And they’re all beagles, right?

(Source: stanakaticland)

the-snazzy-jazzy-pirate-ship:

Whenever you’re feeling down, just remember that Mulan was a real person.

Hua Mulan went to war at 15 years old and eventually led the army for almost a decade, leading countless attacks and winning victories for China. Decorated with honors, she returned home to her happy, living parents. When her army friends visited her, they found out that she was a woman and accepted it. 

Next excuse for limiting women’s rights, please.

image

image

(Source: sarahj-art)

The first official posters for all three films

(Source: thorinds)

barneswinter:

Tony Stark, bribing people into joining the Avengers with beer, money, and birdseed. (The Avengers 2012)

(Source: davelizewski)

kalories:

fraustrodamus:

My mum broke her wrist and didnt want to go to her dinner party with an ugly cast so I broke out some brushes and painted Van Gogh’s ” Starry night ” on it for her.

oh yeah, no biggie, lemme just whip out my brushes and paint a lil something-something. easy.

thisbecjc:

The adorable moment when that’s his real life boyfriend.

OMFG I DID NOT KNOW THAT!! HOLY CRAP 

(Source: bigbangtheory-gifs)

hobbitballerina:

chelseawelseyknight:

witchesbitchesandbritches:

lifeundefeated:

Yea it’s clearly our “generation that’s making homosexuality a trend.” Seriously, pisses me off when people say that. look at this! It’s always been around, it’s not a trend, it’s real. It’s beautiful.

These are really beautiful images.

This makes me really happy

There’s a long history of lesbian-like activity in the West.  In the 19th century US, especially after the Civil War killed off so many young men, middle-class and other genteel girls were encouraged in Boston marriages — relationships with other women of similar educational and class backgrounds.  Since women were considered naturally chaste and disinterested in sex, these love affairs were seen as innocent and spiritual.  Women’s lives were wholly separate from men’s that young women infrequently had male friends who weren’t considered a marriage prospect.  They were encouraged to keep to all-female social circles, and the advent of women’s colleges further encouraged that.  Women were expected to mentor each other, love each other, dance with each other, with the older woman acting as the cavalier, the man in the relationship, protecting and guiding the younger, pursuing her and courting her in ways not unlike how young men would court their brides.  But the prevailing cultural wisdom was that these relationships would be limited to kisses and poetry — women were incapable of sexual desire, they tolerated sex in heterosexual marriages because men were sex-driven beasts who demanded it of them.  Without a man, it was presumed that these relationships would be chaste, innocent, and wholly emotional.  Lesbian-like behaviour is most tolerated when women are perceived as less sexual than men.  Homosexual behaviour becomes threatening when sex is involved — when, in the 1920s, women were seen as able to have sexual drives and the idea of sexually companionable marriages came onto the landscape, Boston marriages suddenly became unnatural and disgusting because they directed women’s sexual interests towards other women instead of to the proper channels: towards men.  The flapper was all about the sexually available (to men) young woman.  She contributed to the demise of widely accepted lesbian or lesbian-like relationships.  As soon as the flapper was capable of wanting sex herself instead of tolerating it from her male partner, lesbian/lesbian-like relationships were threatening, deviant, and ruined young women’s chances to become good wives and mothers.
So remember this as you look at the pre-1920s images.  Those women were allowed these passionate loves, even encouraged in them (sometimes after they managed to get a husband, Eleanor Roosevelt in particular), all because the patriarchy was convinced that women weren’t capable of sexual feelings towards one another.  As long as women were seen as desexed, as creatures of sentiment and emotion instead of passion and desire, lesbianism wasn’t a threat.  The minute women were regarded by patriarchal culture as having a natural sex drive, lesbian-like behaviour became deviant and damning.
We didn’t invent homosexuality in the past 20 or 30 or 50 years.  But we continue to labour under the belief and cultural expectation that women’s sexuality is something owed to and owned by men, forever de-legitimising women’s relationships unless men in some way benefit. 
hobbitballerina:

chelseawelseyknight:

witchesbitchesandbritches:

lifeundefeated:

Yea it’s clearly our “generation that’s making homosexuality a trend.” Seriously, pisses me off when people say that. look at this! It’s always been around, it’s not a trend, it’s real. It’s beautiful.

These are really beautiful images.

This makes me really happy

There’s a long history of lesbian-like activity in the West.  In the 19th century US, especially after the Civil War killed off so many young men, middle-class and other genteel girls were encouraged in Boston marriages — relationships with other women of similar educational and class backgrounds.  Since women were considered naturally chaste and disinterested in sex, these love affairs were seen as innocent and spiritual.  Women’s lives were wholly separate from men’s that young women infrequently had male friends who weren’t considered a marriage prospect.  They were encouraged to keep to all-female social circles, and the advent of women’s colleges further encouraged that.  Women were expected to mentor each other, love each other, dance with each other, with the older woman acting as the cavalier, the man in the relationship, protecting and guiding the younger, pursuing her and courting her in ways not unlike how young men would court their brides.  But the prevailing cultural wisdom was that these relationships would be limited to kisses and poetry — women were incapable of sexual desire, they tolerated sex in heterosexual marriages because men were sex-driven beasts who demanded it of them.  Without a man, it was presumed that these relationships would be chaste, innocent, and wholly emotional.  Lesbian-like behaviour is most tolerated when women are perceived as less sexual than men.  Homosexual behaviour becomes threatening when sex is involved — when, in the 1920s, women were seen as able to have sexual drives and the idea of sexually companionable marriages came onto the landscape, Boston marriages suddenly became unnatural and disgusting because they directed women’s sexual interests towards other women instead of to the proper channels: towards men.  The flapper was all about the sexually available (to men) young woman.  She contributed to the demise of widely accepted lesbian or lesbian-like relationships.  As soon as the flapper was capable of wanting sex herself instead of tolerating it from her male partner, lesbian/lesbian-like relationships were threatening, deviant, and ruined young women’s chances to become good wives and mothers.
So remember this as you look at the pre-1920s images.  Those women were allowed these passionate loves, even encouraged in them (sometimes after they managed to get a husband, Eleanor Roosevelt in particular), all because the patriarchy was convinced that women weren’t capable of sexual feelings towards one another.  As long as women were seen as desexed, as creatures of sentiment and emotion instead of passion and desire, lesbianism wasn’t a threat.  The minute women were regarded by patriarchal culture as having a natural sex drive, lesbian-like behaviour became deviant and damning.
We didn’t invent homosexuality in the past 20 or 30 or 50 years.  But we continue to labour under the belief and cultural expectation that women’s sexuality is something owed to and owned by men, forever de-legitimising women’s relationships unless men in some way benefit. 

hobbitballerina:

chelseawelseyknight:

witchesbitchesandbritches:

lifeundefeated:

Yea it’s clearly our “generation that’s making homosexuality a trend.” Seriously, pisses me off when people say that. look at this! It’s always been around, it’s not a trend, it’s real. It’s beautiful.

These are really beautiful images.

This makes me really happy

There’s a long history of lesbian-like activity in the West.  In the 19th century US, especially after the Civil War killed off so many young men, middle-class and other genteel girls were encouraged in Boston marriages — relationships with other women of similar educational and class backgrounds.  Since women were considered naturally chaste and disinterested in sex, these love affairs were seen as innocent and spiritual.  Women’s lives were wholly separate from men’s that young women infrequently had male friends who weren’t considered a marriage prospect.  They were encouraged to keep to all-female social circles, and the advent of women’s colleges further encouraged that.  Women were expected to mentor each other, love each other, dance with each other, with the older woman acting as the cavalier, the man in the relationship, protecting and guiding the younger, pursuing her and courting her in ways not unlike how young men would court their brides.  But the prevailing cultural wisdom was that these relationships would be limited to kisses and poetry — women were incapable of sexual desire, they tolerated sex in heterosexual marriages because men were sex-driven beasts who demanded it of them.  Without a man, it was presumed that these relationships would be chaste, innocent, and wholly emotional.  Lesbian-like behaviour is most tolerated when women are perceived as less sexual than men.  Homosexual behaviour becomes threatening when sex is involved — when, in the 1920s, women were seen as able to have sexual drives and the idea of sexually companionable marriages came onto the landscape, Boston marriages suddenly became unnatural and disgusting because they directed women’s sexual interests towards other women instead of to the proper channels: towards men.  The flapper was all about the sexually available (to men) young woman.  She contributed to the demise of widely accepted lesbian or lesbian-like relationships.  As soon as the flapper was capable of wanting sex herself instead of tolerating it from her male partner, lesbian/lesbian-like relationships were threatening, deviant, and ruined young women’s chances to become good wives and mothers.

So remember this as you look at the pre-1920s images.  Those women were allowed these passionate loves, even encouraged in them (sometimes after they managed to get a husband, Eleanor Roosevelt in particular), all because the patriarchy was convinced that women weren’t capable of sexual feelings towards one another.  As long as women were seen as desexed, as creatures of sentiment and emotion instead of passion and desire, lesbianism wasn’t a threat.  The minute women were regarded by patriarchal culture as having a natural sex drive, lesbian-like behaviour became deviant and damning.

We didn’t invent homosexuality in the past 20 or 30 or 50 years.  But we continue to labour under the belief and cultural expectation that women’s sexuality is something owed to and owned by men, forever de-legitimising women’s relationships unless men in some way benefit. 

(Source: babycocodill)